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While later on in their career the Beatles may have been afforded all kinds of ridiculous luxuries inside of the recording studio, their first record was a flurry of quick takes and minor flubs. Via Slate:

Some of the forcefulness of “There’s a Place” may have derived from Lennon’s original intent to emulate what he referred to as the “Motown, black thing,” though little of this survives in the finished song. (He was presumably thinking of the Isley Brothers, then signed to the Wand label.) Recorded in thirteen takes, it’s a rough-house performance whose two-part harmony in fourths and fifths shows, if nothing else, that Lennon had a heavy cold; yet the passion of his and McCartney’s singing cuts through, while the band’s drive is fiercely urgent. Lennon supplies the low harmony for McCartney, stepping forward only on the first and third lines of the middle eight and dropping back again to an octave unison for the aerial answering phrases.




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